Posts Tagged ‘halflinger’

Painting a day 2016-Day 9-After the Rain

March 10, 2016
After the Rain

After the rain-horse eye

Day 9 of my painting a day challenge brings me to practice a detail or close up of a subject, my Halflinger cross gelding’s eye.  This painting is based on some photos I shot one evening as the sun was setting after a rain.  The lighting was warm and gave his coat even more of a rusty, orange glow.  The colors were very saturated because of the rain and he still had raindrops running down his mane and forelock.

“The essential joy of being with horses is that it brings us in contact with the rare elements of grace, beauty, spirit, and fire.” ~Sharon Ralls Lemon

 

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Team of blondes–Day 17

February 17, 2015
5"x7" oil on canvas

5″x7″ oil on canvas

Day 17 of the painting a day challenge.

This is a team of Haflingers that I observed at one of the historic farming events I attend.  A beautiful little team with thick, fluffy, blonde manes.  They always reminded me of mini-Belgians, probably part of the reason I’ve been drawn to them.
A bit trivia about the Halflinger breed (info taken from Wikipedia)

The Haflinger, also known as the Avelignese, is a breed of horse developed in Austria and northern Italy during the late 19th century. Haflinger horses are relatively small, are always chestnut in color.  The name “Haflinger” comes from the village of  Hafling, which today is in northern Italy.  The breed is also called the Avelignese, from the Italian word for Hafling, which is Avelengo or previously Aveligna.

Haflingers have many uses including light draft, harness work and various under saddle disciplines such as endurance riding, dressage, equestrian vaulting, and therapeutic riding.  They are also still used by the Austrian and German armies for work in rough terrain. The World Haflinger Federation (WHF), the international governing body that controls breed standards for the Haflinger, is made up of a confederation of 22 national registries, and helps set breeding objectives, guidelines and rules for its member organizations.

Interestingly enough, I read that a Haflinger was the first horse to be cloned.  In 2003, the cloning resulted in a filly named Prometea.

Here’s the link to this painting in the Daily Paintworks Gallery:  http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/veronica-brown/team-of-blondes-value-study/333848