Posts Tagged ‘team’

Painting a day 2016-Day 23-Blinded eye-draft horse study

April 2, 2016
Blinded eye-draft horse study 5"x7" oil on canvas panel

Blinded eye-draft horse study
                  5″x7″ oil on canvas panel

“To be an artist is to believe in life”
-Henry Moore

I have found, while plein air painting, that one of the biggest challenges is to focus on your subject and try to only include it and supporting detail.  As a beginner, you see it all so you want to put it all in your painting.  Squint your eyes…that is what most instructors will remind you.  That does help….if I remember to do it.  Maybe I need to remind myself to look at the subject with “blinders”.  Blinders are meant to keep a horse focused on the road ahead and looking forward….kinda like plein air painting before the light changes.

Here’s another in my series of draft horses.  This guy had one blue eye and one brown eye….those blue eyes in horses are eerily beautiful.  This painting is based on some photo reference I took at my uncle’s farm while he and my cousin were tetting (fluffing) hay so that it dries quicker, with a team of horses.  I believe this big guy’s name was “Bud” and he was part Clydesdale–beautiful horse.

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/veronica-brown/blinded-eye-draft-horse-study/470008

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Team of blondes–Day 17

February 17, 2015
5"x7" oil on canvas

5″x7″ oil on canvas

Day 17 of the painting a day challenge.

This is a team of Haflingers that I observed at one of the historic farming events I attend.  A beautiful little team with thick, fluffy, blonde manes.  They always reminded me of mini-Belgians, probably part of the reason I’ve been drawn to them.
A bit trivia about the Halflinger breed (info taken from Wikipedia)

The Haflinger, also known as the Avelignese, is a breed of horse developed in Austria and northern Italy during the late 19th century. Haflinger horses are relatively small, are always chestnut in color.  The name “Haflinger” comes from the village of  Hafling, which today is in northern Italy.  The breed is also called the Avelignese, from the Italian word for Hafling, which is Avelengo or previously Aveligna.

Haflingers have many uses including light draft, harness work and various under saddle disciplines such as endurance riding, dressage, equestrian vaulting, and therapeutic riding.  They are also still used by the Austrian and German armies for work in rough terrain. The World Haflinger Federation (WHF), the international governing body that controls breed standards for the Haflinger, is made up of a confederation of 22 national registries, and helps set breeding objectives, guidelines and rules for its member organizations.

Interestingly enough, I read that a Haflinger was the first horse to be cloned.  In 2003, the cloning resulted in a filly named Prometea.

Here’s the link to this painting in the Daily Paintworks Gallery:  http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/veronica-brown/team-of-blondes-value-study/333848